Social Security Benefits and Child Support

There are a number of different situations in which Social Security benefits impact child support orders. The extent of this impact depends, at least in part, on the type and amount of the Social Security benefits that the parent is receiving. These circumstances tend to be very fact-specific, but a parent’s receipt of Social Security benefits, in whatever form they may be, significantly affects the outcome of a child support order.

A parent can receive Supplemental Social Security Income (SSI), Social Security Disability (SSD), or a combination of both. SSI is a means-tested government benefit for disabled individuals with very low incomes and a lack of a substantial work history that would qualify them for SSD. On the other hand, SSD is a government benefit that is not based on income. Rather, working individuals pay into Social Security through payroll deductions; later in life, if they become disabled and unable to work, they can receive SSD benefits in order to replace their employment income. Both of these types of Social Security benefits only are available for disabled individuals.

A parent’s SSI benefits are not considered income for the purposes of calculating child support obligations. Burns v. Edwards, 367 N.J. Super. 29 (App. Div. 2004). Therefore, a parent whose only income is SSI may not be ordered to pay child support. The only exception is if the parent also is able to earn or is earning income beyond what he or she receives in SSI. In that case, the additional income would be considered as income for that parent in setting a child support order.

SSD benefits, however, are counted as income for the purposes of calculating a parent’s child support obligation. Furthermore, when a parent receives SSD, the child also may be eligible for a direct benefit from the Social Security Administration (SSA). If the child receives this kind of benefit, it is subtracted from the disabled parent’s child support obligation. Herd v. Herd, 307 N.J. Super. 501 (App. Div. 1998). In some cases, the child will receive a substantial lump sum retroactive benefit. That sum is deducted from the parent’s child support obligation, but only for the period of time during which he or she was responsible for paying child support, and only for that amount of child support. Diehl v. Diehl, 389 N.J. Super 443 (App. Div. 2006).

The intersection of social security benefits and child support is a complex and non-routine matter that is likely to have a significant effect on both parents’ financial situations. We know how difficult and complicated child support cases can be, but we have the experience necessary to guide you through your case. Contact Argentino Family Law & Child Advocacy, LLC, today and we will show you how we can help with your New Jersey child support case. Our attorneys focus their practice primarily on family law and all legal issues related to children, so we are sure to have the skills that you need for proper representation in your family law case. We are here to answer your questions, settle your concerns, and assist you through the often difficult process of contested family law cases.